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Ugandan Promoter And Former Anne Kansiime Manager, Johnson Mujungu, Wife Sentenced In UK For Money Laundering

March 4, 2020

Ugandan promoter and former Anne Kansiime manager, Johnson Mujungu and his wife, Grace Ntolera Mujungu have been sentenced in UK over money laundering.

A married couple from Northfleet who carried out a “particularly cruel” fraud, laundering £120,000 from a man who had recently lost his grandmother, have been sentenced in court.

Johnson Mujungu, 53, has been sentenced to two and a half years’ imprisonment, whilst Grace Ntolera-Mujungu, 42, has been given an 18 month suspended jail sentence.

The couple, both of Struttons Avenue, illegally received a payment of £120,000 after intercepting an email to the victim from a solicitor telling him he needed to pay inheritance tax linked to his late grandmother’s estate.

Investigating officer, Detective Constable Mark Newman of the Kent an Essex Serious Crime Directorate said: ‘This fraud was particularly cruel because the victim had recently lost a family member and he then had to pay the heritance tax twice.

“This couple used the money to pay off debts and pretended that it was a payment for a business transaction.

“I am pleased we have been able to track where the money went and bring those involved to justice.”

L-R: Mujungu, Anne Kansiime and wife, Grace

Newman said that police will now be carrying out further enquiries under the Proceeds of Crime act to see if any money can be returned, adding that “I hope this outcome gives some consolation to the victim.’

The situation developed after the victim received a call that he needed to pay inheritance tax to a firm of solicitors linked to his late grandmother’s estate.

The solicitors sent an email giving instructions on how to transfer the money, but this was intercepted by the defendants who changed the bank account on the email.

The victim ended up paying them the money instead, but quickly realised that the money had not been paid to the solicitors and contacted police who launched an investigation.

Officers discovered that the money had been paid into a business account owned by Ntolera-Mujungu.

Upon receipt of the payment, the money was immediately dispersed into several bank accounts owned by her and her husband who used the money to pay off debts.

Ntolera-Mujungu denied charges of transferring and converting criminal property and Mujunga denied a charge of converting criminal property.

A jury found them both guilty and they were sentenced on Friday 28 February 2020.

Johnson Mujunga received two and a half years’ imprisonment and Ntolera-Mujungu was given an 18 month sentence, suspended for two years.